One Way the Celts Scared the Bejesus Out of the Romans

currently playing on my iPod: Slow and Steady by Of Monsters and Men (thanks Robin!)

During my latest dive into historical research–my passion for old stuff pops up in everything I write–I discovered an instrument called the carnyx. A bronze instrument 3 meters in length, the carnyx played a special role in Celtic ceremony and welfare.

Celts designed the crazy-looking instrument to sound above the heads of warriors to signal specific movements and to make Romans wet their small clothes.

And let me tell you, it wasn’t the animal head–usually a boar or a serpent complete with a wiggling tongue–that scared the enemy. It was the god-awful sound. All I can think of when I hear it is Wow. The Hound of the Baskervilles and a wooly mammoth had a baby. 

Check it. Here’s your chance to see if you freak out like a retreating Roman. A man named John Kenny travels about playing a historically accurate reproduction.

I’m thinking of snagging one to keep the squirrels off my plum tree. Might work. Might get me arrested. Sounds like the beginning of a fun story.

See? I’ve told you that writing goes hand-in-hand with history.

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5 Responses to One Way the Celts Scared the Bejesus Out of the Romans

  1. wordpressreport says:

    Reblogged this on WordPress Report.

  2. 2kdb2 says:

    Reblogged this on Star in the Stone.

  3. 2kdb2 says:

    Catchy title, written with humor; you made an old thing sound interesting. Yep!

  4. Pingback: Play Brass? Going to War? Get Yourself a Carnyx. | Sound the Trumpet: How to Blow Your Own Horn

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